After a Suicide: A Toolkit for Schools | 41 Bringing in Outside Help School crisis team members should remain mindful of their own limitations and consider bringing in crisis team members from other parts of their school district (if there are any), trained trauma responders from other school districts, and/or staff from local mental health centers to help them as needed. Often, crisis team members are also impacted by a suicide death, and it is important that they respond in a way that protects the school community while not diminishing or ignoring their own reactions to the death. In especially complicated situations, schools may even consider bringing in local or national experts in school suicide postvention for consultation and assistance (provided that sufficient funding is available). Such steps should generally be taken in consultation with the community committee, and all outside experts must of course be carefully vetted and references and clearances checked. Following is a list of national organizations that provide crisis response, postvention consultation, and training, and/or that can put schools in touch with appropriate experts: • • The National Association of School Psychologists’ School Safety and Crisis Response Committee provides phone, e-mail, and onsite consultation. • • The National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC) provides schools, agencies, and parents with names of TLC-certified trauma practitioners in their area who are available for consultation and referrals. TLC also has certified trauma trainers who can come to a school, organization, or community to provide training on suicide crisis response and postvention as well as other trauma-related topics. Call 877-306-5256 or e-mail info@starr.org. • • The Dougy Center: National Center for Grieving Children & Families provides phone and onsite consultation and onsite training. • • Many states also have resources available. SPRC’s website provides suicide prevention contacts in every state who can assist you in identifying local experts (www.sprc.org/states). You can also check with your state’s office of education.